Roll Up Porch Shades

Roll up porch shades. Skylight shades room darkening. Bamboo wedding canopy.

Roll Up Porch Shades

roll up porch shades

    roll up

  • Denoting a menu that will display only its title to save screen space
  • form into a cylinder by rolling; "Roll up the cloth"
  • Denoting something that can be rolled up
  • get or gather together; "I am accumulating evidence for the man's unfaithfulness to his wife"; "She is amassing a lot of data for her thesis"; "She rolled up a small fortune"
  • arrive in a vehicle: "He rolled up in a black Mercedes"

    shades

  • Cover, moderate, or exclude the light of
  • (shade) shadow: cast a shadow over
  • Screen from direct light
  • sunglasses: spectacles that are darkened or polarized to protect the eyes from the glare of the sun; "he was wearing a pair of mirrored shades"
  • (shade) relative darkness caused by light rays being intercepted by an opaque body; "it is much cooler in the shade"; "there's too much shadiness to take good photographs"
  • Darken or color (an illustration or diagram) with parallel pencil lines or a block of color

    porch

  • A veranda
  • a structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entrance
  • A vestibule is a lobby, entrance hall, or passage between the entrance and the interior of a building.
  • A covered shelter projecting in front of the entrance of a building
  • In television broadcasting, the front porch is a brief (about 1.5 microsecond) period inserted between the end of each transmitted line of picture and the leading edge of the next line sync pulse.

roll up porch shades – Coolaroo Select

Coolaroo Select Series Top Roll up Sun Shade 10 Feet by 6 Feet, Mocha
Coolaroo Select Series Top Roll up Sun Shade 10 Feet by 6 Feet, Mocha
Select series sun shades are made with the unique knitted Coolaroo fabric. They provide a stylish look with superior durability. The smooth action roller clutch mechanism is designed to provide a smooth even roll even when exposed to extreme weather conditions. Stainless steel tie downs included for a stylish finish to secure the blind in the down position. The superior UB block protects your family furnishings fro mthe damage effects of the sun. A double cooling factor significantly blocking the sun’s heat, but allowing air flow substantially reducing temperatures and reducing energy cost. The weather resistant fabric and components are resistant to fade, mold, and mildew in addition to making hte shade simple to clean. Mounting wood screws are included.

42-25 240 Street

42-25 240 Street
Douglaston Hill Historic District, Douglaston Hill, Queens, New York City, New York, United States

42-25 240 Street (aka 8 – 240 Street) Block/Lot: 8106/5

Date: 1899-1900 (NB 134-1899) Architect: John A. Sinclair Original Owner: Jeannie Clark Type: Free-standing house Style: Queen Anne Stories: 2 ? Materials: Wood frame covered with clapboards and wood shingles, painted gray, above a brick foundation, painted gray. Alterations: The porch enclosed was enclosed in the mid-twentieth century. Notable site features: Sloping site; cobblestone gutter; fieldstone retaining wall; graystone steps; flagstone driveway. Related structure on the site: Wood-frame garage covered with clapboards.

Description: Main Facade (overlooking 240 Street): Irregular bay arrangement; one-story, wood porch with closed pediment, asphalt-shingle-covered shed roof, jalousie windows, non-historic aluminum door and drainpipe; angled bay featuring tapered spandrel, geometrical fasciae above the second story, and asphalt-shingle-covered turreted roof with a bracketed cornice; molded window surrounds; historic twoover-two wood sash; non-historic aluminum drainpipes from the roof. Roof: Asphalt-shingle-covered gable with returning eaves; two brick chimneys with corbelled caps; hipped dormer on the west slope with historic wood casements; non-historic aluminum gutters. North Facade: Irregular bay arrangement; similar to the main facade; non-historic aluminum drainpipes from the roof. South Facade: Two bays; similar to the main facade; electrical conduits; non-historic security lamps. Garage: One bay; asphalt-shingle-covered gable roof; non-historic, paneled wood-and-glass roll-up door; non-historic security lamp.

History: This shingled, Queen Anne-style house was built in 1899-1900 for Jeannie Clark, during the historic district’s greatest period of growth from about 1890 until the First World War, when seventeen of the district’s thirty-one houses were built. Clark resided in the house through the mid-twentieth century. It originally occupied the entirety of Marathon lot 95, a sloping, wooded property that was distinguished by a tall, fieldstone retaining wall wrapping around the corner onto 43 Avenue. Clark subdivided the lot for further development in the 1920s, and most of the wall now lies beyond the boundaries of the historic district. Featuring a polygonal corner tower and turret with paneled moldings and brackets, and a tall brick chimney, this 2 ?-story house was designed by architect John A. Sinclair and constructed by builder Herman Haak.

The positioning of the house, high above the street atop a steep slope, and its picturesque Queen Anne-style design reflect the nineteenth-century ideals of bucolic suburban life. There is a one-story, wood-frame garage located to the north of the house that appears to have been built at a later date. The house remains largely intact.

About the district:

The Douglaston Hill Historic District consists of thirty-one wood frame houses constructed largely between 1890 and 1930. Well-preserved turn-of-the-century residential suburbs of free-standing wood-frame houses were once relatively common in New York City, but are now becoming increasingly rare due to newer development or inappropriate alterations. The majority of the houses were designed using either the Queen Anne, neo-Colonial, or Arts & Crafts styles, making the district visually coherent.

Douglaston Hill was laid out as a suburban development in 1853 in anticipation of the arrival of the Flushing & Northside Railroad.

Development proceeded slowly until the 1890s, when a small group of families acting as realtors, developers and home owners shaped the community. William J. and Josephine Hamilton, Denis and Ellen O’Leary, and several members of the Stuart family were among the first to build in the area and were all prominent residents. William Hamilton, described as the Awell-known builder of Douglaston, developed several lots. Denis O’Leary was a prominent attorney and politician who was active in civic affairs within and outside of Douglaston Hill, serving as an Assistant Corporation Counsel for New York City, Public Works Commissioner, U. S. Congressman and as a founding officer of the Douglaston Hose Company No. 1. The Stuarts were involved in different aspects of the building trades, including architect, contractor, carpenter, and painter.

Most of the houses in Douglaston Hill combine stylistic elements from architectural styles popular from 1890 to 1930. The picturesque qualities of the neo-Colonial, Queen Anne, and Arts & Crafts styles, with their intersecting rooflines, tall chimneys, clapboard and shingle cladding as well as spacious porches, link many of the houses. Nos. 240-25 43rd Avenue and 240-35 43rd Avenue were built in 1900-01 from plans by architect D. S. Hopkins by the O’Learys and the Hamiltons, respectively. They feature deep semi-elliptical porches with classical entry surrounds, Tuscan column

240-02 42 Avenue

240-02 42 Avenue
Douglaston Hill Historic District, Douglaston Hill, Queens, New York City, New York, United States

240-02 42 Avenue (aka 42-01 240 Street) Block/Lot: 8106/15

Date: c.1850, moved to this location and altered in 1927 (ALT 9799-1927). Architect: Not determined (c.1850); Samuel Lindbloom (1927) Original Owner: Not determined (c.1850); Samuel Lindbloom and M. Edwin Schultz or Carra U. Alexander (1927). Type: Free-standing house Style: Italianate with neo-Colonial-style elements Stories: 2 with one-story wings and porch Materials: Wood frame covered with clapboards, painted white; concrete foundation. Notable site features: Mature trees; perimeter hedge; cobblestone curbs and walkway; cobble stone street gutter on 240 Street.

Description: General: Complex footprint and profile consisting of five attached sections and wings of varying sizes and heights. Roofs: Intersecting, asphalt-shingle-covered gables and slopes with overhanging eaves and carved brackets. North Facade (overlooking 42 Avenue): Irregular bay arrangement; projecting brick chimney with tapered base; screened porch with concave roof; projecting window sills; molded window lintels supported by brackets; historic six-over-six wood sash; historic wooden shutters; non-historic aluminum drainpipes from the roof. West Facade (overlooking 240Street): Three bays at the first story; two-bays at the second story; similar to the north facade; historic six-over-six wood sash; louvered roof vent in the gable. South Facade: Irregular bay arrangement; similar to the main facade; historic six-over-six wood sash; non-historic aluminum drainpipes from the roof.

East Facade: Irregular bay arrangement; similar to the main facade; secondary entryway with non-historic aluminum and glass sliding doors; attached garage wing with non-historic aluminum roll-up door and historic pedestrian entryway with a broken pediment, fluted surround, and historic paneled wood and glass door.

History: The main wing of this sprawling Italianate-style dwelling with neo-Colonial-style elements was built c.1850, and moved from an unknown location to this corner lot in 1927, where it was renovated and enlarged. The project was undertaken by local architect/builder Samuel Lindbloom and his partner, M. Edwin Schultz, also a builder, during the enormous growth period of the 1920s, when the population of the Douglaston/Little Neck area increased from 2,000 to 8,000 and several houses were constructed in the Douglaston Hill Historic District on new building sites created by the continuing subdivision of the original Marathon lots. In the 1920s, it was also fairly common to move older houses to new locations, usually to make way for more dense commercial or residential development on the original sites. In addition, interest in historic preservation and Colonial architecture produced many sympathetic rehabilitations of older houses and new house designs based on Colonial-style precedents.

At around the same time that Lindbloom moved this house, he built two new, neo-Colonial-style houses on sites adjoining this one, all of which were originally part of Marathon lot 88. During its construction, Lindbloom and Schultz transferred ownership of this house to Carra U. Alexander, wife of Gavin Alexander, who was president of the Braithe Manufacturing Company. Featuring a complex footprint consisting of five attached sections of varying sizes and heights, the house is visually unified by a large screened porch with a dramatically-sloping, concave roof, and by the approximate reproduction of the original, carved facade ornament of the c.1850 wing on the building’s later additions. Topped by a prominent brick chimney, it remains intact to its 1927 appearance.

About the district:

The Douglaston Hill Historic District consists of thirty-one wood frame houses constructed largely between 1890 and 1930. Well-preserved turn-of-the-century residential suburbs of free-standing wood-frame houses were once relatively common in New York City, but are now becoming increasingly rare due to newer development or inappropriate alterations. The majority of the houses were designed using either the Queen Anne, neo-Colonial, or Arts & Crafts styles, making the district visually coherent.

Douglaston Hill was laid out as a suburban development in 1853 in anticipation of the arrival of the Flushing & Northside Railroad.

Development proceeded slowly until the 1890s, when a small group of families acting as realtors, developers and home owners shaped the community. William J. and Josephine Hamilton, Denis and Ellen O’Leary, and several members of the Stuart family were among the first to build in the area and were all prominent residents. William Hamilton, described as the Awell-known builder of Douglaston, developed several lots. Denis O’Leary was a prominent attorney and politician who was active in civic affairs within and outside of Douglaston Hill, serving as an Assistant Corporation Counsel for New Y

roll up porch shades

Coolaroo Premier Window Sun Shade 8 Feet Wide by 6 Feet High, Desert Sand
The Premier Series Sun Shades are woven of a thin elegant fabric that is fashionable for any home’s exterior or interior. The light filtering weave reduces glare without darkening a room’s interior and also protects your furnishings from the sun’s harmful rays. The Premier shades fabric significantly blocks the suns heat, allows air flow, which allows your home or business to stay cooler, reducing energy costs. This special fabric is resistant to fading, mold and mildew and is easy to keep clean. The smooth action roller clutch mechanism is designed to provide a smooth even roll even when exposed to extreme weather conditions and the stainless steel tie downs are a stylish finish to secure the blind in the down position.

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